This Just In: the sformatino stays in the picture!

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The hit from last week’s Dinners from the Field has an extended run:

Sformatino of asparagus with ramps spumante

On the menu this week.

Sunday Farmhouse Supper menu for April 6, 2014

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Antipasto
Rustic mortadella carpaccio with a caper and lemon vinaigrette and frilly mustard

Primo
Linguine with anchovies, garlic, chili and walnuts

Secondo
Heritage pork shoulder braised in a tomato sauce with potatoes and basil

Dolce
Ricotta and semolina stuffed baked pastry with candied orange

Prix fixe $40.

Served family-style. For groups of one to twelve. Whole table must order prix fixe menu.

(Please note that wine and gratuity are not included.)

call 510-547-5356 or reserve online

Larger parties: please let us know at the time of your reservation if your table will be ordering the Sunday Supper menu so that we can plan accordingly. Thanks!

The Challenges of Spring

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As we’re starting to learn, our upcoming Dinners from the Field are providing the Oliveto kitchen with quite a challenge. Much like the Truffle Dinners in autumn and Tomato Dinners in summer, timing is EVERYTHING. We’ve gone ahead and announced the dates (Tuesday, April 8th through Friday, April 11th) now all we can do is cross our fingers and hope some of the showstoppers (MORELS!!!) make it to the show.

That is why this morning’s email from Connie Green was particularly welcome. According to our favorite mushroom whisperer, the first wave of morels should start showing up in approximately two weeks BUT she makes a point of clarifying that the beginning of morel season arrives in fits and starts as the soil begins to warm up from low to high altitudes. So while these recent rains should definitely help the situation, the cooler turn in temperature: not so much. As mentioned prior, fingers crossed.

Ramps should become available around mid-April as well, which is later than usual due to the crazy winter weather throughout the mid-west. Ms. Green also dropped this particularly interesting nugget of forager’s knowledge: beware of “baby ramps”. Apparently ramp bulbs take a number of years to form. So these “baby ramps” are the product of irresponsible picking, a practice that has led some places to ban ramp harvesting. Who knew? Stay tuned for more updates to the Dinners from the Field menu…

Sunday Farmhouse Supper for March 30, 2014

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Antipasto
Crostino di lardo
Toasted crostino topped with whipped lardo and old balsamic

Primo
Spaghetti al pesto
Spaghetti with classic basil pesto

Secondo
Salsiccia con broccoli di ciccio alla griglia
Grilled Tuscan sausages with broccoli di ciccio and salsa verde

Dolce
Semifreddo con radicchio e yogurt
Yogurt semifreddo with radicchio marmalade

Prix fixe $40.

Served family-style. For groups of one to twelve. Whole table must order prix fixe menu.

(Please note that wine and gratuity are not included.)

call 510-547-5356 or reserve online

Larger parties: please let us know at the time of your reservation if your table will be ordering the Sunday Supper menu so that we can plan accordingly. Thanks!

This Just In: Dungeness crab stuffed artichoke

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photo by William Pye

Baked jumbo artichoke stuffed with Dungeness crab, preserved lemon, and green garlic

Sunday Farmhouse Supper for March 23, 2014

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Antipasto
Insalata di cicoria
Salad of chicories with flageolet beans, Parmesan cheese, and balsamic vinaigrette

Primo
Crespelle alla fiorentina
Baked crepes stuffed with Ricotta cheese and spinach in tomato sauce

Secondo
Polpette d’Artusi
Beef and pork meatballs with tomato, pine nuts, currants, and basil

Dolce
Torta ricciolina
Angel hair pasta pie with almonds and candied orange

Prix fixe $40.

Served family-style. For groups of one to twelve. Whole table must order prix fixe menu.

(Please note that wine and gratuity are not included.)

call 510-547-5356 or reserve online

Larger parties: please let us know at the time of your reservation if your table will be ordering the Sunday Supper menu so that we can plan accordingly. Thanks!

2014 Community Grains Conference [audio]

For those of you that couldn’t make it to the 2014 Community Grains Conference on March 9th it was truly a whirlwind! So many great speakers, and a good deal of groundbreaking information – it was all very exciting. At the same time we were sad we had to turn so many people away, but ticket sold out faster than we expected. Here’s a recording of the day’s discussion if you were unable to attend.

TJI: Halibut with Spring* Three Ways

On the current menu:

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Pan-roasted Alaskan halibut and green garlic-mint pesto with artichokes three ways:
artichoke sformatino
artichoke and saffron riso
and shaved artichoke salad

 

Sunday Farmhouse Supper for March 16, 2014

Sant'Antimo Abbey, south of Montalcino in Tuscany

Sant’Antimo Abbey, south of Montalcino in Tuscany

Antipasto:
Salt cod fritters with olives and capers

Primo:
Ricotta
dumplings dressed in brown butter and lemon

Secondo:
Rabbit braised with white wine, tomato, mushroom and rosemary

Dolce
Almond biscotti-caramel custard

Prix fixe $40.

Served family-style. For groups of one to twelve. Whole table must order prix fixe menu.

(Please note that wine and gratuity are not included.)

call 510-547-5356 or reserve online

Larger parties: please let us know at the time of your reservation if your table will be ordering the Sunday Supper menu so that we can plan accordingly. Thanks!

Heritage Chicken Alert!

On the menu for a brief blip this Saturday, six White Leghorn heritage chickens from the awesome people of Heritage Foods USA. We don’t have the exact menu preparation yet, but Chef Rhodehamel will definitely be doing something very special for this rare delivery. If you plan to come in that night, please use the code “there’s a fox in the coop” when you speak to reservationist. Hahahaha. Just kidding. But do let us know that you are interested in ordering the chicken because we will only have twelve portions available.

Erin Fairbanks of Heritage Foods USA had this to say about the important work they are doing to help revive heritage chicken lines and create alternative markets for non-industrial bred chicken:

White Leghorn chicken

White Leghorn chicken

“Heritage Foods USA is proud to announce we are partnering with Frank Reese, the country’s preeminent poultry farmer, to show our customers what real chicken tastes like.

Heritage chickens are breeds that have been around since before the industrial era. Heritage birds grow at a healthy rate, while industry chickens are genetically manipulated to grow at an unnaturally fast rate that can be harmful to the skeletal, cardiovascular, and immune systems of bird.

The White Leghorn chicken was brought to the US from Northern Italy in 1853 and was admitted to the American Poultry Association’s standard of Perfection in 1874. These chickens are fantastic egg layers and known for being active and ambitious. Those raised on Frank Reese’s farm are still able to retain their foraging and productive nature. There are many different varieties of Leghorns, but the remaining non-industrial White variety is only raised by a very small number of breeders.”